Celebrate Earth Day at a National Park

Celebrate Earth Day at a National Park

Here are some great tips and tricks for family fun in our national parks! cialis sale usa Enjoy: There are few more beautiful places to picnic than our national parks, which also offer other ways to spend quality time with your family: Exercise: You can run, hike, bike, swim and even do yoga in our national parks! Bring lots of water and wear light-colored clothing to keep you cool. The Healthy Parks, Healthy People program also offers organized activities for families and children. viagra pills for sale Learn: National parks are our country’s biggest classroom, protecting and preserving our vast landscapes, history and culture. And Parks for Play is a National Park Foundation program that offers educational family activities in 35 of our national parks. What To Bring: erfahrungen mit viagra 100mg o   Bring a hat and sunglasses to protect you from the sun viagra 100mg ou 50mg o   Don’t forget a camera o   Bring a bag or backpack filled with the essentials – water, snacks and a map of the park   cialis 5mg I recently wrote you about the launch of Find Your Park, a new campaign celebrating 100 years of the National Park Service and encouraging the next generation – and those who already know and love the parks – to get up, get out and Find Your Park! The White House, First Lady Michelle Obama (see below), Mrs. Laura Bush and celebrities including Bill Nye and Bella Thorne are also lending their efforts to the initiative. Share your family stories and photos on social media with #FindYourPark and go to FindYourPark.com to find your local park. With more than 400 parks across the country, there’s...
Fillmore, Millard

Fillmore, Millard

Millard Fillmore US President – 1850-53 Born: January 7, 1800, Summerhill, NY Died: March 8, 1874, Buffalo, NY Full name: Millard Fillmore Presidential term: July 9, 1850 – March 4, 1853 Buried: Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo Millard Fillmore – Early Life In his rise from a log cabin to wealth and the White House, Millard Fillmore demonstrated that through methodical industry and some competence an uninspiring man could make the American dream come true. Born in the Finger Lakes country of New York in 1800, Fillmore as a youth endured the privations of frontier life. He worked on his father’s farm, and at 15 was apprenticed to a cloth dresser. He attended one-room schools, and fell in love with the redheaded teacher, Abigail Powers, who later became his wife. Millard Fillmore -The Law and Politics In 1823 he was admitted to the bar; seven years later he moved his law practice to Buffalo. As an associate of the Whig politician Thurlow Weed, Fillmore held state office and for eight years was a member of the House of Representatives. In 1848, while Comptroller of New York, he was elected Vice President. Fillmore presided over the Senate during the months of nerve-wracking debates over the Compromise 1850 He made no public comment on the merits of the compromise proposals, but a few days before President Taylor‘s death, he intimated to him that if there should be a tie vote on Henry Clay’s bill, he would vote in favor of it. President Millard Fillmore Thus the sudden accession of Fillmore to the Presidency in July 1850 brought an abrupt political shift in the...
Tyler, John

Tyler, John

John Tyler US President – 1841-45 Courtesy of the National GuardDubbed “His Accidency” by his detractors, John Tyler was the first Vice President to be elevated to the office of President by the death of his predecessor. Born in Virginia in 1790, he was raised believing that the Constitution must be strictly construed. He never wavered from this conviction. He attended the College of William and Mary and studied law. Serving in the House of Representatives from 1816 to 1821, Tyler voted against most nationalist legislation and opposed the Missouri Compromise. After leaving the House he served twice as Governor of Virginia. As a Senator he reluctantly supported Jackson for President as a choice of evils. Tyler soon joined the states’ rights Southerners in Congress who banded with Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and their newly formed Whig party opposing President Jackson. The Whigs nominated Tyler for Vice President in 1840, hoping for support from southern states’-righters who could not stomach Jacksonian Democracy. The slogan “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too” implied flagwaving nationalism plus a dash of southern sectionalism. Clay, intending to keep party leadership in his own hands, minimized his nationalist views temporarily; Webster proclaimed himself “a Jeffersonian Democrat.” But after the election, both men tried to dominate “Old Tippecanoe.” Suddenly President Harrison was dead, and “Tyler too” was in the White House. At first the Whigs were not too disturbed, although Tyler insisted upon assuming the full powers of a duly elected President. He even delivered an Inaugural Address, but it seemed full of good Whig doctrine. Whigs, optimistic that Tyler would accept their program, soon were disillusioned. Tyler...
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