Folding the American Flag

Folding the American Flag

Folding the American Flag You may know that the American flag is folded 13 times when it is lowered or when it is passed on to the next of kin at the burial of a Veteran, but you might not know why. Here is a breakdown of what each fold represents . . .     The first fold of our flag is the symbol of life. The second fold is a symbol of our belief in the eternal life. The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran(s) departing our ranks, who gave a portion of life for the defense of our country and to attain peace throughout the world. The fourth fold represents our weaker nature; for, as American citizens trusting in God, it is in him we turn to in times of peace as well as in times of war for his divine guidance. The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it still is our country, right or wrong.” The sixth fold reminds us of the six battle-weary fighters who vigilantly struggled to the top of Mount Suribache on Iwo Jima during World War II. Once there, they proudly raised above the battle our flag, the symbol “that we all hold dear,” the symbol of “freedom, democracy, government of the people, by the people, and for the people.” It is our duty to defend the flag which stands for them all. The seventh fold is for where our hearts lie. It...
Flag Day

Flag Day

Flag Day originated when a schoolteacher arranged for his pupils to celebrate the ‘Flag’s Birthday’ on the anniversary of the ‘Stars and Stripes,’ on June 14th. In 1894, the governor of New York directed the American flag be displayed on all public buildings on June 14th, and the day became known as Flag Day.

The American Flag

The American Flag

The American Flag   Where exactly did our national flag come from?  Believe it or not, no one knows!  Historians ventured a guess and thought perhaps a man named Francis Hopkinson designed it.  It was also believed that a seamstress from Philadelphia named Betsy Ross hand-sewed the first official flag.  It is certain that a man named Francis Scott Key wrote the words to the ‘Star Spangled Banner’, a song about the flag.  It wasn’t until June 24th, 1912 that an Executive Order was given recognizing the flag as our national symbol. There were many variations of the flag flown as the country was formed, but finally on June 14th, 1777 (Flag Day or the Flag’ s Birthday), the final design was established.  The American Flag began with 13 stripes of alternating red and white, and 13 white stars in a blue field.  This represented the ‘New Constellation’ that was the 13 colonies.  It wasn’t until August 21st, 1959 that President Dwight D. Eisenhower provided for the arrangement of the stars in nine rows staggered horizontally and 11 rows staggered vertically as we see the flag today.   Flag Day originated when a schoolteacher arranged for his pupils to celebrate the ‘Flag’s Birthday’ on the anniversary of the ‘Stars and Stripes,’ on June 14th.  In 1894 the governor of New York directed that on this day the Flag be displayed on all public buildings.  Finally in 1942, Congress officially recognized the Pledge of Allegiance, although one year later the Supreme Court would rule that school kids could not be forced to recite it. What do you need to know...