Tyler, John

Tyler, John

John Tyler US President – 1841-45 Courtesy of the National GuardDubbed “His Accidency” by his detractors, John Tyler was the first Vice President to be elevated to the office of President by the death of his predecessor. Born in Virginia in 1790, he was raised believing that the Constitution must be strictly construed. He never wavered from this conviction. He attended the College of William and Mary and studied law. Serving in the House of Representatives from 1816 to 1821, Tyler voted against most nationalist legislation and opposed the Missouri Compromise. After leaving the House he served twice as Governor of Virginia. As a Senator he reluctantly supported Jackson for President as a choice of evils. Tyler soon joined the states’ rights Southerners in Congress who banded with Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and their newly formed Whig party opposing President Jackson. The Whigs nominated Tyler for Vice President in 1840, hoping for support from southern states’-righters who could not stomach Jacksonian Democracy. The slogan “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too” implied flagwaving nationalism plus a dash of southern sectionalism. Clay, intending to keep party leadership in his own hands, minimized his nationalist views temporarily; Webster proclaimed himself “a Jeffersonian Democrat.” But after the election, both men tried to dominate “Old Tippecanoe.” Suddenly President Harrison was dead, and “Tyler too” was in the White House. At first the Whigs were not too disturbed, although Tyler insisted upon assuming the full powers of a duly elected President. He even delivered an Inaugural Address, but it seemed full of good Whig doctrine. Whigs, optimistic that Tyler would accept their program, soon were disillusioned. Tyler...
Jackson, Andrew

Jackson, Andrew

Andrew Jackson US President – 1829-37 Birthdate: March 15, 1767   Born in a backwoods settlement in the Carolinas in 1767, he received sporadic education. But in his late teens he read law for about two years, and he became an outstanding young lawyer in Tennessee. Fiercely jealous of his honor, he engaged in brawls, and in a duel killed a man who cast an unjustified slur on his wife Rachel.More nearly than any of his predecessors, Andrew Jackson was elected by popular vote; as President he sought to act as thedirect representative of the common man. Jackson prospered sufficiently to buy slaves and to build a mansion, the Hermitage, near Nashville. He was the first man elected from Tennessee to the House of Representatives, and he served briefly in the Senate. A major general in the War of 1812, Jackson became a national hero when he defeated the British at New Orleans. In 1824 some state political factions rallied around Jackson; by 1828 enough had joined “Old Hickory” to win numerous state elections and control of the Federal administration in Washington. In his first Annual Message to Congress, Jackson recommended eliminating the Electoral College. He also tried to democratize Federal officeholding. Already state machines were being built on patronage, and a New York Senator openly proclaimed “that to the victors belong the spoils. . . . ” Jackson took a milder view. Decrying officeholders who seemed to enjoy life tenure, he believed Government duties could be “so plain and simple” that offices should rotate among deserving applicants. As national politics polarized around Jackson and his opposition, two parties...
St. Patrick’s Day

St. Patrick’s Day

As with almost any holiday’s origin, there seems to be multiple recordings of how St. Patrick’s Day began. Almost all sources agree that St. Patrick’s name was originally Maewyn Succat. ..

Earth Hour – March 29

On Saturday, March 27, 2010 at 8:30 p.m., during Earth Hour (sponsored by the World Wildlife Fund), hundred of millions of people around the world will turn off their lights for one hour in a vote for action on the climate crisis. The Goddard Schools have created the following projects for kids to explore Earth Hour (and Earth Day in April). Create the Earth. Eco-friendly coffee filters make great miniature earths. In two separate cups, use food coloring to make blue and green colored water. Then allow the children to use eyedroppers to drop the colors on their Earth (coffee filter). When the colored water is dropped on the filter it spreads a bit and the children can create land and water shapes on their “little earths.” Lights Out, Flashlights On. Play “I Spy” in the dark. Have the children use flashlights to locate objects they can use to become more “green,” such as a light switch or recycle bins. Go for a Nature Walk. Place tape, sticky side out, on the children’s wrists and take them outside to collect things in nature. You could also decorate a sack and go around the neighborhood picking up litter. Dress It Up! Hold a fashion show using old newspapers as the runway. Create vests by using grocery sacks decorated with recycled supplies such as used yogurt cups, etc. Glue recycled materials to the vests and decorate with paint. Then let your kids show off the “beauty of recyclables” while learning what items can be recycled. Make Rainsticks. Recycle old paper towel rolls by making rainsticks. Have the...

Harriet Tubman Day – March 10

From ClassBrain.com Ask ClassBrainHarriet Tubman By Sarah Lane Jan 28, 2003, 12:53pm harriet Topic: Harriet Tubman ClassBrain Visitor: What if there was no Harriet Tubman? What if she was never born? What state would the United States be in? Would slavery still be going on? ClassBrain Response: The type of question you asked us is called a hypothetical question. This means that the question is an assumption or concession made for the sake of argument. We could ponder all the possibilities you mentioned about Harriet not being born including slavery issues and the state of the United States. But one fact remains: Harriet Tubman was very much alive and a very important part of American history. Here is a ClassBrain article on Harriet Tubman: Harriet Tubman – American Abolitionist Born into slavery in 1820 in Dorchester County, Maryland, Harriet Tubman was a spy, nurse, feminist, and social reformer.  Small and frail in appearance, her looks were very much deceiving.  She escaped from bondage and for 16 years guided over 300 slaves to freedom in the North by way of a secret network of safe houses later called the Underground Railroad.  She was known as the Moses of her people.    As one of 11 children, Tubman was fortunate enough to grow up in a loving and nurturing environment created by her parents.  The rest of her life was spent in constant turmoil.  An incident in which she was struck on the head was the cause of recurring seizures which rendered...

James Madison’s Birthday – March 16

The Papers of James Madison James Madison 1751-1836   James Madison was the fourth U.S. President.  He was born in Port Conway, Virginia on March 16th in the year 1751.  He had the nickname of the Father of the Constitution because of how he helped to lay the original groundwork for that important document.  After graduating from the College of New Jersey, which is now called Princeton, he helped to establish the Bill of Rights, served in the Continental Congress, and was a great contributor to the Constitutional Convention of 1787.    James Madison was elected president in 1809 and continued to hold office until 1817.  James was a strong leader. He had to be, since he led this country through the War of 1812.  He was married to Dolley who supported him in his endeavors and was known as a charming hostess.  The pair eventually retired to Montpelier, Virginia where Madison served as the rector of the University of Virginia until his death in 1836.   Source:     Biography.com, A & E Television Networks   Additional Learning Links for James Madison   The Papers of James Madison Here you will find a short biography on the former president, Madison documents, volumes published to date, a bibliography, and other websites of interest. Source:              Papers of James Madison Reading Level:   Hard   James Madison Family Tree This site has a modern diagram showing the Madison family tree, as well...

Women’s History Month Links to Learning

Gale Group’s Guide to Women’s History Month Here teachers and students can choose from a variety of activities and information. Read biographies about women or enjoy activities taken from the Women’s History Month Resource Book and excerpts from Women’s Rights on Trial.Source: Gale, Inc.Reading Level: Moderate History Channel Check the schedule as the History Channel tells the life story of a different extraordinary woman each day. Read profiles, watch a video of history-making women, or check out the special feature on women’s suffrage.Source: A & E TelevisionReading Level: Moderate National Women’s Hall of Fame Come stand among great women as you read about history, the mission, and the women of the hall. You can even honor an extraordinary woman in the National Women’s Hall of Fame Book of Lives and Legacies.Source: National Women’s Hall of FameReading Level: Hard National Organization for Women Learn about the history of this organization and its current major campaigns. Read articles concerning the future of women and other important issues. Find out about how to take action and get involved by contacting your local chapter.Source: NOWReading Level: Adult The Ninety-Nines Read about this unique organization founded in 1929 by 99 licensed women pilots for the mutual support and advancement of aviation. There are sections on women who paved the way, women making history today, and advancing the pilots of tomorrow.Source: The 99’s, Inc.Reading Level: Moderate Women Sustaining the American Spirit This site is celebrating Women’s History Month with news articles, events, imagery, an art gallery, and more. Visit each section of our military – Army, Air Force,...

Alexander Graham Bell’s Birthday – March 3

Alexander Graham Bell 1847-1922     Alexander Graham Bell 1847-1922   Born on March 3rd, 1847 in Edinburgh, Scotland, Alexander Bell eventually settled in Boston.  He graduated from high school at age 14 and was primarily self-taught.  He continued teaching others for the remainder of his life.  You probably are aware of the fact that he was the brain behind transmitting vocal messages by electricity.  You might not know that he taught the deaf how to talk.  Bell tutored private students including Helen Keller!  He also founded the American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf.  He founded Science, the magazine, in 1880, and the National Geographic Society in 1888.  He was even president of the National Geographic Society from 1896 to 1904.   As far as inventing the telephone goes, Bell had to prove to everybody by doing demonstrations that his invention could actually work.  Finally on March 7th, 1876, he was granted a patent from the U.S. Patent Office for the ‘electronic speaking telephone.’  It was patent number 174,465.  In July of 1877, the Bell Telephone Company was formed.  They built the first long distance telephone line from Boston to New York.  Everyone wanted to be the one to invent this great device so Bell had to go to court many times to prove he came up with the idea first.  There were 587 lawsuits and five went to the Supreme Court.  He won every case.   Do you know what the very first sentence...
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