Women’s History Month Links to Learning

Gale Group’s Guide to Women’s History Month Here teachers and students can choose from a variety of activities and information. Read biographies about women or enjoy activities taken from the Women’s History Month Resource Book and excerpts from Women’s Rights on Trial.Source: Gale, Inc.Reading Level: Moderate History Channel Check the schedule as the History Channel tells the life story of a different extraordinary woman each day. Read profiles, watch a video of history-making women, or check out the special feature on women’s suffrage.Source: A & E TelevisionReading Level: Moderate National Women’s Hall of Fame Come stand among great women as you read about history, the mission, and the women of the hall. You can even honor an extraordinary woman in the National Women’s Hall of Fame Book of Lives and Legacies.Source: National Women’s Hall of FameReading Level: Hard National Organization for Women Learn about the history of this organization and its current major campaigns. Read articles concerning the future of women and other important issues. Find out about how to take action and get involved by contacting your local chapter.Source: NOWReading Level: Adult The Ninety-Nines Read about this unique organization founded in 1929 by 99 licensed women pilots for the mutual support and advancement of aviation. There are sections on women who paved the way, women making history today, and advancing the pilots of tomorrow.Source: The 99’s, Inc.Reading Level: Moderate Women Sustaining the American Spirit This site is celebrating Women’s History Month with news articles, events, imagery, an art gallery, and more. Visit each section of our military – Army, Air Force,...

Women’s History Month Timeline of Achievements

Women’s History Month Timeline Women’s History Month Timeline of Achievements   ClassBrain has compiled a list of pivotal moments in the women’s rights movement through the years from a number of sources. Together it forms over 150 years of work towards equality and recognition for women.   1848 – Over 300 men and women held the first Women’s Rights Convention.  At this time, 68 women and 32 men signed The Declaration of Sentiments.  This set of 12 resolutions called for equal treatment of men and women, and for women to have the right to vote.   1869 – MAY: The National Women Suffrage Association (NWSA) is formed to achieve voting rights for women by means of Congressional amendment to the Constitution.  NOVEMBER: The American Women Suffrage Association (AWSA) is established with a goal of gaining voting rights for women through amendments to individual state constitutions.   1890 – The NWSA and the AWSA merge to form the National American Women Suffrage Association (NAWSA).   1893 – Colorado is the very first state to adapt the amendment giving women the right to vote.   1903 – The National Women’s Trade Union League (WTUL) is formed with the goal of advocating for improved wages and working conditions for women.   1919 – The Federal Women’s Suffrage Amendment (originally introduced to Congress in 1878) is passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate, and sent to the states...

Profiles of Great Women: Part 4

Profiles of Great Women (4) Profiles of Great Women – Part 4   Harriet Tubman – American Abolitionist Born into slavery in 1820 in Dorchester County, Maryland, Harriet Tubman was a spy, nurse, feminist, and social reformer.  Small and frail in appearance, her looks were very much deceiving.  She escaped from bondage and for 16 years guided over 300 slaves to freedom in the North by way of a secret network of safe houses later called the Underground Railroad.  She was known as the “Moses of her people.”    As one of 11 children, Tubman was fortunate enough to grow up in a loving and nurturing environment created by her parents.  The rest of her life was spent in constant turmoil.  An incident in which she was struck on the head was the cause of recurring seizures which rendered her unconscious without warning at various times in her life.  Eventually, she married John Tubman, a free African American from Cambridge in 1844.    She built the Harriet Tubman Home for Aged and Indigent Colored People in 1908.  During WWII a liberty ship was christened the Harriet Tubman in her honor.  She led many people to freedom and helped to undermine the institution of slavery.  Harriet Tubman died of pneumonia on March 10th, 1913 and was buried in Ohio with military honors. Source:              Biography.com   Additional Learning Links for Harriet Tubman   The Underground Railroad Here you can learn about Harriet...

Profiles of Great Women: Part 2

Profiles of Great Women (2) Profiles of Great Women – Part 2   Jackie Joyner-Kersee – Track and Field Athlete Jackie Joyner was born on March 3rd, 1962 in East St. Louis, Illinois.  She came from a family well know for its athleticism as she was the younger sister of Olympic track and field star Al Joyner, and sister-in-law of the late track star Florence Griffith Joyner.  Not only did she overcome asthma to become a world heptathlon record holder, but she won several Olympic medals as well.  In high school she was a basketball and track star, gaining an athletic scholarship to UCLA.  She achieved her B.A. in History and in 1986 married Bob Kersee.   Perhaps Jackie’s greatest personal victory came when she became the first woman to ever win the gold medal in the long jump.  She made history at the 1988 Olympics.  She also won the silver for the heptathlon in 1984, and the bronze in the long jump in 1992.  Although she retired after the Goodwill games in Atlanta, Georgia in 1998, Jackie Joyner-Kersee still holds the world record in the long jump at 24 feet and 7 inches.  She has since founded the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Community Foundation, which is dedicated to helping disadvantaged youth. Source:     Biography.com, IAAF   Additional Learning Links   International Association of Athletics Federations Read a short biography on Joyner-Kersee as well as other biographies from athletic legends such as Carl Lewis and Marita Koch...

Profiles of Great Women: Part 3

Profiles of Great Women (3) Profiles of Great Women – Part 3   Emily Dickinson – Poet Emily Dickinson was born on December 10th, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts.  She grew up and remained at home without ever marrying.  She graduated from Amherst Academy in 1847.  It has been said that seven to ten poems of hers (no one could agree on the number) were published during her lifetime anonymously and without her permission.  Regardless, the editors altered them.    Between the years 1858 and 1866, Dickinson wrote more than 1100 poems.  Publishers continued to ignore her original metaphors, aphorisms, paradoxes, off rhymes, and eccentric grammar.  She continued to write, however, with the major focus on subjects such as love, separation, death, nature, and God.   On May 15th, 1886, Emily Dickinson died of nephritis, a kidney disease.  Although she never got to experience the fame she craved, the magic of her poetry is appreciated greatly by all who have studied, read, and understood her talent. Source:     Biography Resource Center   Additional Learning Links for Emily Dickinson   Emily Dickinson International Society This site allows you to access the Emily Dickinson Journal, the society’s scholarly periodical and the Emily Dickinson Bulletin, the society’s newsletter.  Their purpose is to promote, perpetuate, and enhance the study and appreciation of Emily Dickinson throughout the world.  They help to establish and support local chapters and a center for Dickinson studies. Source:              Case Western...

Profiles of Great Women: Part 5

Profiles of Great Women Profiles of Great Women – Part 5   Abigail Adams - American 1st Lady Born in Weymouth, Massachusetts in 1744, Abigail Smith Adams was a minister’s daughter.  She was self-taught and she home-schooled the five children she had with her husband, John Adams.  She married him in 1764 and the marriage continued to be strong for 54 years.  Although she might have secretly resented the expense of entertaining and lack of privacy her husband’s position caused her family, she always did her best to provide him with support.    Abigail Adams wrote many letters to people during her life and formed a unique friendship with Mrs. Washington.  Her son, John Quincy Adams, later became our 6th president.  Finally, in 1801, she and her husband retired to Quincy, Massachusetts and enjoyed a private life for 17 years.  She died in 1818 and was buried next to John.  She will always be remembered as a patriot, First Lady, wife of one President, and mother of another. Source:     Biography.com, White House.gov   Additional Learning Links for Abigail Adams   The White House Read the complete biography of this patriotic First Lady as well as the many strong women to follow in her footsteps.  Access information on the Presidents as well. Source:              White House.gov Reading Level:   Moderate   The American Presidency From the American Presidency comes this biography of Abigail Adams as well as...