Lewis and Clark: The Basics

The Basics Who:  Meriwether Lewis & William Clark, about 33 Members of the Corps of Discovery, and various people who came and went. What:  A scientific voyage with the purpose of charting the area between the Missouri River and the Pacific Coast and discovering the Northwest passage.   Where:  Between the Missouri and Columbia River systems. When:  The story begins on January 18, 1803 with the secret letter sent to Congress by Thomas Jefferson requesting financial backing for an expedition to explore the Missouri River.  The story ends on September 23, 1806 when the expedition returns from the now charted West to St. Louis. How:  Over land on foot and using tributaries and rivers when possible.  Members of the group collected plant and animal specimens, studied Indian cultures, conducted diplomatic councils, established trading relationships with tribes, and recorded weather data. Why:  To open the unknown west for future development. Source:  Time, Inc., PBS Online Cite this… (new...

Lewis & Clark Additional Learning Links

Additional Learning Links for Lewis & Clark The Ultimate AdventureTime has put together The Ultimate Adventure for the Bicentennial of Lewis & Clark.  A reflection on their sacrifice and achievement, you’ll find 15 articles on topics ranging from Homeland Security to Sacagawea, 11 ways to follow their trail, and original pages from the Lewis & Clark journals.  Be sure to check the Table of Contents.Source:  Time, Inc.Reading Level:  Moderate Discovering Lewis & ClarkA Legacy website since 1998, this site focuses on Persistent Issues, Core Values, and Changing Visions.  Through the use of a 19-part synopsis by Harry Fritz, a Professor of History at the University of Montana, Missoula, this website progresses with interpretative episodes.  There are selections from the Lewis and Clark journals, photographs, maps, animated graphics, moving pictures, and sound files.Source:  VIAs, Inc.Reading Level:  Moderate The Journey of the Corps of DiscoveryThis film by Ken Burns takes you inside the Corps, the life of Native Americans, and The Archive.  Check out the timeline of the expedition, maps or read the journals of the Corps.  Into the Unknown is an interactive expedition where you lead the group into uncharted territory.  Make decisions crucial to your survival and see how long you would last filling in for Meriwether Lewis.Source:  PBS Online, GM General Motors Reading Level:  Moderate Lewis and Clark 200This is a partnership between 32 federal agencies and organizations with one goal:  To provide and easy to use web portal with information about various Lewis and Clark places.  Choose from the list with over 50 links to information.Source:  Jay RasmussenReading Level:  Advanced Lewis and Clark...

Lewis and Clark Quiz

Lewis & Clark Quiz Lewis & Clark Quiz Choose the best possible answer from the choices given and have fun!   1. What were Lewis and Clark’s first names? Huey and KentMeriwether and WilliamJamal and Gable     2. In what year did the infamous expedition begin? 180319061789     3. How long did the expedition take? 2 weeks10 months3 years     4. Whose idea was it to begin this adventure? Lewis & ClarkThomas JeffersonCongress     5. How many original members were there in the Corps of Discovery? 1053317     6. How many years has it been since Lewis and Clark’s journey? 2002000102     7. Members of the group collected plant and animal specimens, set up trade relationships, and what? recorded weather datacarved and sold wooden trinketsmade friends with local bears     8. What was the most important accomplishment of the expedition? The data collected on plant and animal specimensOpening the unknown west for future developmentboth of these were very important     9. Sacagawea was a major part of the expedition because…. she could speak Shoshoni, Minitari, and French.she knew the land and how to find food.of both of these reasons.   10. What was the name of Clark’s slave whom he took on this mission? BennyTomYork   When you are done, click the finished button and your score will appear in the box.<br Created with The Big Bus’s Test Maker – www.thebigbus.com Cite this… (new...

The Lewis and Clark Expedition

In 1801, during a time when the West was anything past the Mississippi River, President Thomas Jefferson asked Congress to fund an expedition.  His personal secretary, Meriwether Lewis, would command this first operation of its kind.  In the spring of 1803, Lewis wrote to William Clark, asking him to join the expedition as his partner.  Clark accepted and that summer they prepared for the trip.  On May 14th, 1804, a group of almost 50 people launched an expedition up the Missouri River from Camp Dubois.  The Corps of Discovery with Lewis and Clark as leaders, were to find a waterway across the entire continent.  Their intention was to continue on until they reached the ocean and record data of everything they saw.  On the 4th of July they celebrated the first ever Independence Day west of the Mississippi River.  The next few months were spent recording information in their carefully kept journals.  They found almost 200 new plants and over 100 animals before they reached the Pacific Ocean.  Aside from encountering many Indian tribes, Lewis & Clark and their crew braved below freezing temperatures.  Grizzly bears were nearly impossible to kill and the Missouri falls were difficult to navigate.  Sacagawea, a young Indian woman, was an interpreter and guide to the group as she knew the southwest land so well.  If it wasn’t for her help, the group would have suffered badly.  On September 11th, the Corps of Discovery braved the Bitteroot Mountains and snow.  It took them until late November of 1804 to reach the Pacific Ocean.   The group finally made the return trip and landed...

How Lewis & Clark Left Their Mark

How Lewis & Clark Left Their Mark After 200 years it would be nearly impossible for the Lewis and Clark expedition not to be dramatically romanticized.  After all, the original purpose of the journey was to discover a waterway that traversed the entire continent, and they never did discover this elusive Northwest Passage.  So why are names like Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Sacagawea, York, and even a Newfoundland dog named Seaman still so alive in our historical accounts and minds today? Much of history consists of fables and tall tales.  Is true that ancient stories in combination with preserved documents and historical artifacts reflect the foundation of entire cultures alive today.  The history of the world is fraught with many glorified stories.  They live in our minds and pass from one generation to the next because of specific identifications we make with the players.  Lewis, Clark, and all who went with them are important historical players in American mythology.  Their mission had nothing to do with greed, money, and murder (considering their very existence at times depended on the help they received from a young Native American mother),  but had everything to do with the creation of a tight-knit family in order to survive.  This is a very familiar tale in American history.  Yet this historical expedition is still powerful enough to create an ongoing debate over its actual significance today. We know exactly what occurred on this perilous quest due to the excellent recordings and journals left behind by the group.  The Corps of Discovery was not the first group to see the land...