Activities for Veterans Day

Activities for Veterans Day

Veterans Day activities afford the schools and the local community an excellent opportunity to produce a variety of cooperative programs. Participation by patriotic organizations can enhance the projects suggested in this guide.

Patriotic Costumes

Show your patriotic spirit with one of these fun 4th of July costumes. 4th of July Cheerleader Costumes Patriotic Cheerleader Blue Velvet Child Small (6-8) Support the home team! Patriotic Cheerleader Blue Velvet Child Large (10-12) Support the home team! Peace Hat USA Peace Hand Hat What do you get when you cross the sign of peace with the American Flag? Statue of Liberty Costumes Statue Of Liberty The grand old lady herself! Statue of Liberty Torch (Latex) The finishing touch for your Liberty costume. Uncle Sam Costumes Uncle Sam Costume Adult “WE WANT YOU!” Hat Uncle Sam, Felt A great 4th of July hat! Uncle Sam Mask You can’t go wrong with Uncle Sam! Uncle Sam Hats Adult Great for plays or patriotic costumes! Uncle Sam Foam Hat A great hat for your Halloween costume or for 4th! Cite this… (new...

Veterans’ Day and Armistice Day – November 11

The War to Begin all Wars It’s hard to imagine that World War I involved 35 countries. It lasted five years, from 1914 to 1918. The United States only fought from 1917 to 1918. A year was more than enough time, however, to claim too many lives, and people held tight to the notion that this was the very last war. When the fighting stopped, leaders of several countries signed an Armistice on the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month. An Armistice is an agreement to stop all fighting, in other words a truce. This truce was signed on November 11th, 1918 at 11 A.M. This is important to know because Veterans’ Day was originally called Armistice Day. This day was set aside to reflect and remember the sacrifices men and women made during World War I in order to ensure peace. The first official celebration was on November 11th, 1919. Veterans who survived the war marched in parades and were hometown heroes. A Veteran is any soldier who has fought in a war. Ceremonies were held and speeches were made. World War I was called ‘the war to end all wars’ because everyone hoped there would never be another one. Almost 20 years later in 1938, Congress voted Armistice Day a federal holiday. Unfortunately the very next year, in 1939, World War II began. This ended the theory of no more wars. It seemed that with the progression of war came the progression of death. Over 16.5 million Americans took part in World War II and 407,000 died in service....

Veteran’s Memorial Road Race

Veteran’s Memorial Road Race “The only USA Track & Field-certified 11K running in American that honors our veterans (past, present and future) on their national day of recognition – VETERANS DAY.” “100% of the Race Proceeds are donated to the Veterans Northeast Outreach Center, Inc. a private, non-profit 501c (3), regional resource center serving Veterans and their families.  Established in 1985, the agency provides a number of services and programs assisting Veterans and their families. Their mission statement is to provide the highest quality of services to assist, support and advocate for all veterans and their families in the greater Merrimack Valley.” They provide . . . Transitional housing and support services for 22 homeless Veterans Information on Veterans services, VA claims, military records, VA Health Care and other information Emergency food supplies as part of their “Veterans Community Food Pantry” A “VetMeals” Food Service program offering low-cost meals to Veterans and their families Structured day programs with recreational, educational, and therapeutic components Employment counseling, resume preparation, and educational and placement services Affordable housing facilities at their Veterans Campus properties offering 10 single bedroom apartments available for homeless and disabled veterans So if you live in or around Stoneham, Massachusetts go to this page to fill out a general application or here for a group application to participate in the race! Source: Veteransrace.com Cite this… (new...
Folding the American Flag

Folding the American Flag

Folding the American Flag You may know that the American flag is folded 13 times when it is lowered or when it is passed on to the next of kin at the burial of a Veteran, but you might not know why. Here is a breakdown of what each fold represents . . .     The first fold of our flag is the symbol of life. The second fold is a symbol of our belief in the eternal life. The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran(s) departing our ranks, who gave a portion of life for the defense of our country and to attain peace throughout the world. The fourth fold represents our weaker nature; for, as American citizens trusting in God, it is in him we turn to in times of peace as well as in times of war for his divine guidance. The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it still is our country, right or wrong.” The sixth fold reminds us of the six battle-weary fighters who vigilantly struggled to the top of Mount Suribache on Iwo Jima during World War II. Once there, they proudly raised above the battle our flag, the symbol “that we all hold dear,” the symbol of “freedom, democracy, government of the people, by the people, and for the people.” It is our duty to defend the flag which stands for them all. The seventh fold is for where our hearts lie. It...

Veterans’ Day Learning Links

Veterans Day Links Veterans’ Day HistoryScan this explanation for our nation’s day of remembrance and discover the many aspects of Veterans’ Day. Find out why the number 11 is significant to its history. Source: United States EmbassyReading Level: Moderate Restoring Veterans’ Day Part of ‘Citizenship Education’, this page not only gives you the origins of Veterans’ Day, but a suggested community program of events. This could be used for both Veterans’ and Memorial Day. Source: Veterans of Foreign WarsReading Level: Moderate Veterans’ Day National CommitteeOn the Veterans’ Day homage you’ll find the history of Veterans’ day, and classroom projects and activities. Check out the link list or print out a Teacher’s Guide. View Veterans’ Day posters from 1978 to 2001. Source: Department of Veterans AffairsReading Level: Moderate Participate in the ClassBrain Veteran’s Memories ProjectFind out about this important project and participate in the national effort to collect stories and experiences of war Veterans. The American Folklife Center and Library of Congress are collecting and preserving oral histories, documents, photos, movies, and anything else they can find on America’s war Veterans. Source: Library of CongressReading Level: Advanced How We RememberThis is a special look at how they remember Veterans in the UK, which is where many of our ceremonies in the US originate.Source: BBCReading Level: Advanced Special Report: W.W.I Remembered This special report on World War I will give you access to a variety of resources. Watch and listen to why we commemorate the Armistice at the 11th hour. Read the map of war deaths from 1914 to 1918 and find links to several war stories. Be...
The Origins of Veterans’ Day

The Origins of Veterans’ Day

In 1921, an unknown World War I American soldier was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. This site, on a hillside overlooking the Potomac River and the city of Washington, became the focal point of reverence for America’s veterans. Learn more…

The Story of War Poetry

C:WINNTProfilesAdministratorDesktopMelissa’s DocumentsClass BrainArticles for the SiteVeterans_Story of War Poetry The Story of War Poetry There are many tried and true methods for reflecting and remembering difficult times in our lives. We talk endlessly to others who share our experiences. We write our stories in prose, in poetry, hoping to gain a sense of peace and the ability to move on. Some things, however, are near impossible to forget. War is one of these. No one wins in a war. On both sides people die, suffer, and never forget. Two poets who address this situation clearly and poignantly are John McCrae and Wilfred Owen. John McCrae lived from 1872 to 1918. A Canadian physician, he fought on the Western Front in 1914. Soon he was transferred to the medical corps and assigned to a hospital in France. He died of pneumonia while on active duty in 1918. He is perhaps most remembered for his poem about the famous poppies concurrent with the soldiers who had died. He wrote his famous poem In Flanders Fields the day after presiding at the funeral of a friend and former student. His poem is now a memorial to all Veterans.In Flanders Fields – John McCrae In Flanders Fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved, and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the...
The American Flag

The American Flag

The American Flag   Where exactly did our national flag come from?  Believe it or not, no one knows!  Historians ventured a guess and thought perhaps a man named Francis Hopkinson designed it.  It was also believed that a seamstress from Philadelphia named Betsy Ross hand-sewed the first official flag.  It is certain that a man named Francis Scott Key wrote the words to the ‘Star Spangled Banner’, a song about the flag.  It wasn’t until June 24th, 1912 that an Executive Order was given recognizing the flag as our national symbol. There were many variations of the flag flown as the country was formed, but finally on June 14th, 1777 (Flag Day or the Flag’ s Birthday), the final design was established.  The American Flag began with 13 stripes of alternating red and white, and 13 white stars in a blue field.  This represented the ‘New Constellation’ that was the 13 colonies.  It wasn’t until August 21st, 1959 that President Dwight D. Eisenhower provided for the arrangement of the stars in nine rows staggered horizontally and 11 rows staggered vertically as we see the flag today.   Flag Day originated when a schoolteacher arranged for his pupils to celebrate the ‘Flag’s Birthday’ on the anniversary of the ‘Stars and Stripes,’ on June 14th.  In 1894 the governor of New York directed that on this day the Flag be displayed on all public buildings.  Finally in 1942, Congress officially recognized the Pledge of Allegiance, although one year later the Supreme Court would rule that school kids could not be forced to recite it. What do you need to know...